How we survive- Or don’t

[Trigger warnings mainly for suicidality, but also for abuse, neglect, medical abuse, police brutality, ableist violence and plain old ableism]

Here’s the reason I’m still here: Because at the times of my life, my childhood, my teens, my adulthood, where I’ve wanted to die I’ve had people I knew would be upset I was gone.

I’m doing really well with my mental health over all lately- I have had a few bumpy days here or there, but I’m overall a happy person now. Even when I’m having the bumpy days, I’ve become someone with a happiness underneath inside me to keep me moving and using positive coping strategies. Even on days when I have panic attacks. Even on days where I’m having flashbacks, though it’s buried pretty deeply on those days. Even on days where I feel a general hopeless miasma. It feels surreal, if I’m entirely honest.

It feels surreal because for the vast majority of my life  to this point I’ve lived my life with the undercurrent being a constant feeling of worthlessness. I make no secret that I have been hospitalized for suicidality a decent number of times, though mostly in my teens and childhood. I’ve been coercively hospitalized most of those times that I’ve been hospitalized after the age of consent to treatment, told that if I didn’t “voluntarily” go that they would issue the legal documents to involuntarily put me there.  The others were because of a fear that they would reach that point if I didn’t.

Here’s how I survived, and it had nothing to do with hospitalizations. (For me their major benefit was as a reset for environmental triggers, not treatment.) I had a few people who I knew would be devastated either emotionally or, when I was at my worst times, financially by my death.  I don’t mean the sort of things that a long spoken piece I heard last night at a suicide prevention fair was meant to force you into guilt out of. I mean a more organic level of guilt, not one imposed by others, and a pathological but useful level of anxiety over how I impact others.

I worried that my best friend would struggle emotionally if I died. (He has saved my life multiple times both this way and by being present for me.) I worried that people would judge my mother. I worried I would be even more resented. Later, as it became worse and a lot of this became harder to care about, I became fixated on the financial burden my death would cause my family. The Average American cost of funeary expenses is $8-10k, and can vary also depending on what your state requires (there’s some real… lobbyist dictated laws on deathcare) and your personal and religious needs. Knowing how much it would cost my family both made me feel worse about myself and also kept me from following through on my ideations.

There were a few times where I had a more passive suicidality, where I was too depressed to do anything to take care of myself without detailed step by step prompting. In those cases I wasn’t dependent on these, but because it would have been suicide by neglect all it took was heavy prompting to get some assistance, to read, to do the coping strategies even though I didn’t feel they were working. These were effort intensive for my loved ones. So was my mother fighting off medication induced psychosis, suicidality, and health issues when I was in middle school. So was my mother  fighting the school to keep me, a crazy person with a DD, not only in school but in access of academic content suited to what I needed not just what their lowered expectations were. So was my mother fighting against the repeated recommendations to put me away in a juvenile psychiatric institution. And ALL of it was worth it- and would have been even if my MH status had never changed.


I never thought I’d live past 20/ where I come from some get half as many

— Hamilton in My Shot, from the musical Hamilton by Lin-Manuel Miranda

I really didn’t. Past 20, then past 25. And yet I will turn 29 this summer, and 30 is fast approaching.

Where I come from, though, wasn’t a place or time where people were dying of childhood diseases and fevers on a regular basis, wasn’t a hurricane plagued region, and wasn’t in the situation of being an orphan.

Instead I came from group therapies, wards, and treatment settings. There are people I was in these settings with whose brain got them, either because of what they were already fighting or because of medication induced symptoms. Some got off with even harsher health side effects to abusive over medication practices by our providers than I did. (I’m not anti-med, I’m anti-uncritically assuming they are right for every case and the assumption that you are safe to simply accept what is dictated by a P-doc without question, which is how the system is actually built.) Some in these settings ended up getting restrained to death, or secluded until they stopped finding a reason to continue. Some ended up having attachment therapy techniques rec’d to their parents- techniques, like aggressive holding therapy, extensive isolation periods, and extensive food based reward-punishment systems that were unsuited and left them malnourished as punishment for being disabled. Smothered, starved, neglected.

Some had those causes of death, but at the hands of parents. Some accidental, some on purpose. Some were buying into the mercy killing narrative that permeates our society. Some were trying to administer restraints or a holding regimen and were told that their child yelling “I can’t breathe!” was a punishable behavior or symptom to be ignored by the people who trained them. Speaking of people who couldn’t breathe, some were killed by cops who saw their crazy and far too often their race (or just their race and later used their crazy as an excuse for their paperwork) and restrained them to death, or neglected needed medical care, or just outright shot them. Their killers in either case either got off or got off light in too many cases.

And some just fell so far out the cracks of a system that ignores the need for high LoC Community based services for people who are “just crazy,” or didn’t “have time” to follow through foster systems well enough.

And every single one of their deaths were tragedies. None of them were blessings, and to say they were shows an appalling lack of belief in our humanities. Many of us were difficult to support and took a lot of effort to support, and we are worth more than having our deaths summed up as a “relief.” We are and were all whole real people- whole real people with heavy struggles and deep pain, whole real people called broken to our faces, but we were and are Whole Real People.

None of our deaths were blessings.

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New Year~ aka, That Post Where I Talk Difficulties in Goal Setting

Hello folks! This is a more informal post than usual, so your patience is appreciated and I promise I’m working on a post more typical of my blog for sometime later this month! [Note: contains some mention of abuse and PTSD.]

I have a big goal this year- the same goal I had for my Birthday, and for Rosh Hashanah: write more. I enjoy writing, and I enjoy the feeling I have when I hit publish, and yet I write so rarely. Part of this is executive dysfunction, part of this is depression, and part is anxiety. Lately, I often find myself using the excuse of “well, if I’m doing so well right now, I ought to use that exclusively on work stuff!” any time I have more than a few minutes of good processing power in me. (In fact, when I’m done with this post I’ll probably work instead of doing any of the zillion things I should be doing for myself, being as how it’s technically winter break. Oops.)

If I have to quantify this goal- because I’m really trying to train my brain to think in SMART goals as well- I’m aiming, as always, for 12 posts minimum in 2016. I hate quantifying my yearly goals though. When I fail, there’s this wave of “not okay” that comes over me. Back when I did weight related rather than action related goals, this would trigger an eating disorder behavior of some sort.

But the big thing is really PTSD related. Any time I fail at anything- even something small that other people aren’t really bothered with- I have Rick’s voice in the back of my bead going, “If you weren’t so smart, we’d lock you away.” “We should lock you up, you are worthless.” “I don’t know why we bother keeping you at home.” On bad days, it leads to a dissociative episode. And really, this is usually UTTERLY disproportionate to the stimulus that triggered it, because that’s how PTSD works. Having a spelling error pointed out at the wrong time has lead to hours long episodes- I still work, in fact that might be all I do other than cry and repeat bad mantras, but it’s still there. I’ve had larger episodes that have faded in and out over a week. It’s ridiculous, really impacts my ability to behave professionally, but it’s also uncontrollable. I’ve gained the ability, slowly and over time, to make it more something that can be hidden behind the computer screen (thank you telecommuting- there’s no way I could last in an in person office at this point.) But even that doesn’t always work, because of the nature of a dissociative episode makes it even more difficult to conceptualize what works in a reasonable turn around. It, in short, sucks.

There are other general goals I have too, but they are perpetual ones that I always have. Leave the house at least once weekly, preferably more often and under my own steam but once with help satisfies it. If I don’t, the agoraphobia sets in heavily. It becomes increasingly difficult to leave, particularly under my own steam. Even my ability to call anyone on my very short “safe” list gets smaller. (Currently, the safe list is my parents, siblings, niece, eventual-BiL, and best friend.) And while I’m not always successful- thank you mix of mental health wackiness and chronic illness- It’s something I continue to try to work on, with no end in sight.

Speaking of, one of the things I’m going to aim for today? Walking to Sheetz in my town. (I made it to one of the pubs last night, though I got out before the NYE celebrants started showing up en mass.)

Heavy pale red headded femme in a Tardis Dress, Tardis head band, lots of makeup, and steam-punky jewelry in a pub

Here I am around 7pm New Years Eve about to leave the pub I made myself go to to fulfill my goal. I had the bouncer take this so I had a picture of the dress on me. [image description in alt text]

Try to work on phone phobia is another perpetual goal. This week, I actually called someplace to order food- and it was a big deal. I’m going to call my best friend, who it’s become harder to call, when I’m done with this paragraph. (Thank you new year for the scripted calls you make possible.) This aspect of my mental health disabilities is a particularly disabling one, both personally and professionally. Some of this has improved as people in general get more comfortable with ascribing meaning to online interactions. Some of it I’ve developed accommodations for myself, though the willingness to implement those accommodations is hit or miss, even in the cross-disability community. People just don’t get that I can speak on a webinar or scripted/semi-scripted telecast but can’t handle an actual phone call with ease. It’s an entirely different format to execute for me, but it’s still a struggle.

This is a thing that I’ve decided to work on- even though it’s disability related, and even though I still try to implement my accommodations. Sometimes it feels even more difficult, because too many people don’t get that the ways you are disabled fluctuate depending on a lot of- and sometimes difficult to identify- factors. But it’s something that seems an area that I want to work on, which is reasonable to work on, and which comes with many opportunities to celebrate small steps and have it understood by my fellow phone-phobics and phone-averse people as to why it’s worth celebrating, and why it’s worth working on. I don’t know if I’ll ever reach a point where the phobia is completely gone, or where I don’t need any accommodations sometimes, but I do hope that I can get to a point where I can still grit my way through the times where people aren’t willing to work with me about it.

(Aside: AH VOICEMAIL. What a glorious invention.)

I forgot one thing! And this is for you too! There’s an Instagram challenge that Two Thirds of the Planet is instigating this year called #365dayswithdisability! Just post a picture of your disabled self/life every day with the #365dayswithdisability tag on Instagram (or twitter, Insta is kind of hard to access if you don’t have a smart phone!) My personal Instagram is @nicocoer if you want to follow me!

Anyhow, I hope this post made you think about your own difficulties with setting and completing goals. Feel free to share those- or even just your new years goals!- in the comments below. Happy 2016!

Lists and doing them sadly

[Content: Mentions of Depression, of Partial Hospitalization programs, and of the feelings/enjoyment/good at charts?]

One of the exercises I learned as a kid about depression involved making a list of the Things I Enjoy Doing. There was also the Things I Am Good At list, and the These Faces on the Chart Match My Feelings Today list. There were lots of other ones, but I’ll stick to these ones because they are the Alternative Coping Mechanism lists.

When I was in a partial program, the day would begin with listing the feelings off the chart of faces on the wall, and this would happen at several points during the day- usually at any transition. Part of it was to track our self assessment, but it was also supposed to help us identify our feelings more accurately, and learn what the facial expressions were for them. If someone showed an emotion “wrong” the teachers would demonstrate “appropriate” ways of showing emotions. If someone chose emotions that flagged their depression screens, we’d have to add an extra thing to the “Things I Am Good At” list. I’ve also seen it listed as a “Strengths” list. Every day, we’d have to come up with 3 things we were good at. It was passable to repeat the same things most days (which I did- I did the same for the face charts most days) though coming up with new ones was a “good sign.”

If I remember correctly, my charts usually looked something like this:

Mood: Apathetic/Ambivalent

Savannah is good at:

    • Animals
    • Reading 
    • Art

I seem to remember a lot of “Ambivalent” on my sheets after a staffer explained what it meant. And I could list off those “Strengths” half asleep by the end of  my time in the partial program.

A lot of time was spent on the identification of “appropriate coping skills.” We had lots of sheets and stories on the differences between passive, assertive, and aggressive responses to things, but like several of the kids in the program I found practicing them difficult- I could repeat line by line the “assertive” response I was taught at home, but if it was my mom’s second husband this was a “behavior” and “manipulative,” so what was the point?

The other was the “Things You Enjoy List.” It was basically supposed to be a list of things you liked doing so that if you began to slip into a depressive episode then you could look at the list and do one of the things to remind you of good feelings- or at least put off the omni-present gloom of a depressive episode for a little while. At the time, my list was essentially as follows:

Savannah Enjoys:

    • Playing with animals
    • working with animals
    • reading
    • doing art

Seeing as how this is basically a re-wording of my “strengths” list, I think that I had quite a few frustrated staff trying to figure things out. I had a dog, maybe more, at home at the time (my pet timeline and my treatment timeline aren’t ones I have attached to each other to be sure,) and I sometimes would volunteer with the support of my Theraputic Staff Support at a local hab aide riding facility. (Though I think that might have been after the partial program…) Since they were trying to teach me social stuff too, having me go read to myself in the corner wasn’t exactly feeding into the treatment goals that had been developed, and there’s only so many times I go from group art session into hyper focusing on my own project to completely miss the group part before they throw their hands up in the air.

The one exception was in the summer when an additional word was added: “swimming.” We would “field trip” once a week if we were there during summer sessions, and usually it would be to the pool. While there was some supervision, it wasn’t close enough to tell the difference between playing with other kids and playing in the midst of other kids in the pool. I lined up in lines to jump into the deep end more because of knowing that if I didn’t the life guard wouldn’t let me jump in at all. But as the pavement left my feet and I plunged into the pool, it was heavenly.

I get why they made us do these lists. One of the things that always ends up on the “things to help with your depression!” lists is “do something you love/a hobby.” And it’s good advice- unless your depression manifests itself by making even things you love unappealing. You know that you really enjoy super heroes, or crime shows, whatever, but when you scroll past them on Netflix or Hulu none of them seem interesting, nothing appealing. You got a whole big stack of Forensic Anth style Crime novels, but starting that first book seems … unsatisfying. You have a massive knitting project that you loved when you started, but you went on hiatus and now that it’s been a while you can’t remember why you enjoyed it.

At least, that’s what it’s been like for me for a while. It’s pretty much horrible- I love being able to invest myself in something I love, completely zone into it for hours and hours on end. I like to hyper focus, to learn a ton of facts that only seem important to me, to have access to knowing everything about such and such a thing, to watch every episode, read every book, listen to every song in a completest fashion. And a lot of times when I’m depressed, it robs me of that. I can’t even get started on binge reading the Tudor book I picked up a few months ago and was so excited about.

For a while, I was working on this by baking once a week regardless of if I felt up to it or not. This worked best with cookies- They are pretty basic to make, but you can also make them as complex as you like. I’m a pretty good baker according to the people I feed, and when I complete something there’s a tiny pop of having completed something- almost like the feeling of gaining experience points in an RPG.

So I know that actually following through can help stymie a depression spiral. The problem is actually following through on doing things. And when impaired Executive Functioning mixes in, identifying those things in the moment is just that much more difficult.

So I’m going to do a bit of a sad list here of things I know I enjoy, but which I might forget about. I want to take this idea that was used a little awkwardly for me in a treatment setting, and rebrand it as my own and as an assistive tech of sorts. If you are reading this and want to join me, feel free to do so whatever way feels worthwhile for you.

This is about helping you. It isn’t about making others feel better about your depression/anxiety/etc. It’s about having a tool to help yourself. The things you write down only has to be things you enjoy, and as long as it isn’t harming others it doesn’t matter what it is. If it’s flapping and rocking for hours, that’s fine. If it’s meowing in your room, that’s cool. This is about you and what might make you feel good, not any one else. Yes, you may want to have a safe, private area to do them (you don’t want to harm people or subject yourself to undue risk/the law) but they are still for you. You can do them in whatever tense you like. I’m doing third person partially because of familiarity, and partially because I want to break off the connection between writing about my care plans in third person and leaving them in the control of service providers and staff who might or might not have my best interest at heart.

Things that Savannah remembers enjoying that she might forget:

  • Baking things. Savannah likes baking things. Cookies are easy.
  • Cooking for other people. This sadly requires other people, as cooking for herself is a different set of brain ordering and decision making, so Savannah rarely makes complex dishes just for herself.
  • Going to the coffee shop to write. Savannah likes the coffee shop and the people there, and even though Savannah is nervous about actually interacting with people who aren’t on her “safe” list outside of advocacy contexts she does like being around people in small to moderate amounts when non-scripted interaction isn’t needed. 
  • Writing. Savannah likes writing, but she can’t get started much of the time because of her Executive Functioning issues and/or self-consciousness. 
  • Savannah likes throwing things when she is frustrated. Savannah has soft things that she can throw in a room safely, so that she doesn’t harm people or objects in doing this when she feels she needs it. 
  • Savannah likes Earl Grey Tea, especially in the Star Trek Mug. The steps in making EGT are: 1) get out cup 2) get out tea bag 3) put tea bag in cup 4) put water in electric kettle 5) turn kettle on 6) wait 7) electric kettle clicks off 8) Savannah pours water over tea bag 9) tea steeps 10) add a little almond milk 11) drink tea. 
  • Crime novels. Savannah can either read them or listen to them on audio book from the library. Savannah has a big stack of Patricia Cornwell books to read. 
  • Sci-fi and fantasy stories. Savannah likes sci-fi and fantasy. Even though she is tired when the TOR.com newsletter comes, she should try to remember how much she enjoys the short stories in there. 
  • Savannah likes vocalizing. This is not the same as talking, but can including singing. Meowing, purring, beeping, meeping, and screaming all are examples of vocalizations that make Savannah feel better. (The screaming is better for up at Her mom’s house in the woods though.)
  • Savannah likes the recumbent bike. It doesn’t put stress on the joints the way that other equipment does. But Savannah both has difficulty getting to it, and has a hard time seeing it as a priority. She also needs to be careful not to over do it, especially when she has stuff to do the next day.
  • Savannah likes certain TV shows. This includes, but is not limited, to: Doctor Who; Law & Order (various incarnations); Criminal Minds; CSI (NY or Original); Bones; Agents of Shield; Sleepy Hallow; Project Runway; Castle; Eureka; Warehouse 13; Numerous genre stuff that the BBC puts out; regency-ish period dramas; American Pickers; Oddities; and so on. 
  • Savannah has a lot of youtube channels she watches. She does like the science ones a lot, but she needs to remember that she also likes the non-science ones she’s subscribed to, so maybe she should watch some of those beyond vlogbrothers and weezywaiter. There’s nothing wring with liking the science channels, but Savannah is often pleasantly surprised when she follows through watching the other channels too. 
  • Savannah likes genre movies. She often forgets about watching them because they seem like more energy than they really are. It is okay is Savannah doesn’t remember what the movie was about later, too. It’s okay to turn it off half way through if Savannah decides it’s actually bad and it’s not about trying to watch it like normal people. It’s ok to get distracted and wander off while the movie is running. 
  • Remember: Savannah particularly likes watching Super Hero Movies, Period Dramas, and The Decoy Bride. It’s okay for Savannah to watch Captain America or any movie as many times as she likes as long as she gets her work done and she falls asleep before sunrise. 

Okay, that’s my attempt at an undated and more useful to me list. What does yours look like?

Quickly, Now, Present.

Yesterday, Linda Holmes wrote a review of Allie Brosh’s book (which you should all read– if you haven’t read her blog, she’s a painfully real yet comedic story teller, and if you have there’s some new pieces in it.) for NPR. Except it didn’t look like a lot of book reviews, it wasn’t static- it was more about what it means for Brosh (and others like Donald Glover) to write about their struggles not from the perspective of having overcome them or left them in the past, but of having them in the present. I feel like the following gets to the core of the essay:

But there’s something to be said for the currency of Brosh’s vivid, sometimes nervous-making chronicles, or of Glover’s scribbled notes. It’s very sterile and very misleading to hear about battles only from people who either have already won or at least have already experienced the stability of intermediate victories. It presents a false sense of how hard those battles are. It understates the perilous sense of being in the middle of them. It understates how scary they are.  -Linda Holmes, Present Tense: Allie Brosh, Donald Glover, And Hurting Right Now, NPR

Holmes was talking about this in the form of writing- be it a book, a blog, or pictures of what you’ve scribbled out in a hotel room.  I do try to engage in this sort of writing myself, but so much of what has driven things has been the past. And I’ve told about my past so often, some of it has lost the painful desperation. Other things haven’t, and I try to limit my posts here on this blog to events that even when they are from the past are connected, somehow, with what things are right now. Current events, new perspectives, placing them within a larger context than “I.”

It’s difficult, but not as difficult as opening up about what is emotionally current in my life, In September, I started a post. I hope to get it out soon, but I’ve been saying that since the day I opened the tab to start writing it. It’s been difficult, even though the most intimate parts are there in the draft folder already, waiting for those finishing touches and paragraphs of framing research to connect it to the larger contexts. But it’s waiting, and going into the file means sitting there, paralyzed as to what words could possibly come next. And with that is a circling terror- is it safe to say this “aloud?” 

Writing about our current emotional statuses is hard. Allie Brosh has written a little bit about it, if I recall, though within the larger context of her depression. I know that when I keep trying to go back to any of the posts in my draft folder, terror comes out. It’s not just confronting the now, getting it out into words, though that too is difficult. Part of the terror is that every word I write brings me closer to sending it out into the world. And that can, indeed, put my freedom and peace of mind at risk, not because of a lack of privacy or anything like that, but because being as open and raw and now as that invites the care mongers to flood in. I fear greatly that people will react as though I don’t have steps in place, as though I’m not surviving through this, that I need rescued. That if maybe I was forced to the “right” doctors I wouldn’t have this now. (Hint: as someone who has had various points of this now for most of my life and have been in treatments for the majority of that time, you forcing me or having someone else force me into another hospital or care setting isn’t the “right” approach.) And by making it go out into the world, I’m putting myself at risk for your loving emotional violence.

I do write anyways. Not always here, but somewhere. I write poetry; I use tumblr. And part of that isn’t just because of writing, but because of the impact that writing can have. I know that writing can change a person’s mind or life— I’ve both been changed and have heard from people whose minds/lives I’ve helped change. But that action goes beyond writing, beyond casting into the void for another void-dweller to pick up and carry next to their heart.

Because that power goes beyond it. I’ve been involved with advocacy for many years now, since I was a child. Large chunks of that has been in mental health advocacy. And when the topic of ferreting out some more, new advocates comes up, the family members present and the service system people present always tag on something I find both counter productive and slightly obscene: “… who are stable/well/successfully managing their Mental Issues now.”

Don’t get me wrong- it’s important to take care of one’s self and to take time for yourself in this work.  Immeasurably so. But that is something different entirely from what those words say. They say that the people who frame themselves as our allies don’t see us as worth working with. That our insights must necessarily be wrong, or useless, or both. It says that they care more about our pasts than our present, let alone our futures.

I hear these words from people who are supposed to be working on changing or reforming the system as it stands right now, and it’s clear they don’t actually want the words and experiences and, yes, wisdom of the people who are in it right now. These people seem, from here, to want to insulate themselves from the difficulties and fear that they would be confronted with in working with someone who they know is “still in it.” They can’t wrap their heads around following through with the needed support to actually work with “those” people— consciously or not, they cling to the idea of supporting a person with Serious Mental Illness (a technical classification) being both a burden and necessarily paternalistic in nature. I do hope that for most of the people I work with it isn’t a conscious thought, but it comes out here and there, and not just on this issue.

It’s a deeply misleading flaw, as much as relying on written narratives which makes those struggles into a past. Then we sit and wonder what went wrong in our efforts, even though the very reasons we bring to people to justify advisories like ours tell us why. We go to offices and we say, “Self advocate advisories are needed because you can’t see what the flaws are if you aren’t on the end that will experience them. You can’t watch flaws in a plan that about a life outside of your experience.”

There are other things wrong with the “but are well now” direction. It dis-empowers people further who are already dis-empowered on both societal and systemic levels. It enforces a framework that leaves those with disabilities that are life long, including those with DDs, being seen as less “valid” observers and contributors. It further continues the stigma about being actively mentally ill, even within circles that claim to push for de-stigmatization. It reinforces the messages that we’ve internalized telling us our voices are worthless. But as far as a fatal functional flaw? I believe that Holmes’s comments on writing are the crux of it.

 It’s very sterile and very misleading to hear about battles only from people who either have already won or at least have already experienced the stability of intermediate victories.

Daylight (A Personal Note on Winter)

I am multiply disabled. I’m even disabled neurologically in more than one way. I am an Autistic with anxiety and depression, cataplexy (possibly narcolepsy going by family history), learning disabilities, and a tendency toward agoraphobic episodes. For some reason, those interact to my least benefit during the winter months.

First, I become anxious and distracted. My anxiety starts making acting on my knowledge instead of my anxiety difficult in November. I begin to worry about things that I am otherwise never in doubt of. I try to fight my anxiety, but this sometimes means I say or do things that make people feel blamed or sad. But I don’t have a strong enough filter at this point to turn it off.

By the end of December I’m depressed, isolated, and feeling as though I am not doing well at non-“work” related interactions. Sometimes circumstances make this more intense. I have family members who too often do things that will set off some of my trauma related issues, leading to ongoing tensions and misunderstandings.

I also come from a family with multiple faith traditions– most of my extended family are Christian, and some of a more conservative sort of Christianity that has essential conflicts with my beliefs. Accordingly, I have received gifts ranging from christian themed chocolate (which as much as I question why a devote christian would be cool with eating chocolate Jesus, I deal with because a) chocolate and b) They usually go to support their churches charitable works) to inspirational novels about a “lost” woman coming to christianity via a man– something that becomes a bit offensive when you realize that they all know I’m not remotely Christian and in fact follow Judaism. Additionally, that side of the family’s Family Dinners tend to be very pork centric, and I end up eating potatoes, rolls and sometimes salad if my mother made it.

I don’t really have access to my own faith community due to our location, which makes a lot of these little things less easy to put up with. It is indeed harder to deal with microaggressions when it’s difficult to find others. Indeed, the things that don’t bother my friends so much in areas with substantial Jewish communities are harder here where there isn’t a community to fall back on.

January, I reach the point where I feel incompetent. I don’t follow through with the things I need to do to maintain my personal relationships, interacting primarily in indirect ways, avoiding direct personal interaction. My interactions are instead primarily related to the efforts I maintain in advocacy or other work interactions. I feel apathetic about most personal things on an emotional level at this point- nothing seems particularly appealing to an extreme amount. I force myself to leave the house every few days, because otherwise I’ll need someone else’s physical presence to leave. It becomes an overwhelming thing to leave home, more so than any other episodes of agoraphobia I have throughout the year, easier to rationalize with the weather though it might be.

By February, without my consent, I find myself angry at myself. I know that these patterns are a function of my anxiety and depression meeting up with the decrease in available sunlight, but I still feel upset. Frustrated that this year I couldn’t prevent it. Especially as I begin to notice the way people are to it everything that has happened. I’ve lost friends from it in the past, had them assume that my going without directly personally interacting for a while was about me being upset with them. (This is according to what they’ve told me.) It’s more than my periods of not knowing when  to contact people or where I stand are. This is more.

I know this is hard. It is a hardness I both feel and hear from others. I know that I am not an easy friend. I know that this is a convergence of the least beneficial parts of me. But that they are parts of me, parts that at other times come together in other ways under different lights.

This is a personal note. A request to those who know me personally to grant me patience in the winter. To know it’s not about our relationships, but about my brain chemistry, unsure how to adapt quickly enough.

To have faith that the world will turn, the tilt shifting, and that spring- and daylight- will come again.

Shreds

I am not really sure how to start this post, in part because I feel like saying anything would be a risk. A risk to my on going well being, a risk to my security in housing, in healthcare, in access to the basics. But I think that that fear is just a symptom of what I’m talking about.

Last March, my placement on SSI was approved by a judge. I think my lawyer was a good one, even though he was the sort of man who terrifies me because his demeanor triggers some unpleasant memories. The judge didn’t even ask me to come into the courtroom- he decided based on my paperwork to offer me a deal which included me having a payee, which is actually something that is preferable to me because of the sort of things I have difficulties with. The waiting room was tense, and there was plenty of papers to sign, but in the end it turned out alright. My mother and I went to the sushi place across from the courthouse there in Wexford, and I had avacado and cucumber sushi.

The problem lies in what it took to get to that point. You see, the entire process involved looking at everything I can do, and find the limits, the deficits, and the flaws. Highlighting the things that I can’t do, and expounding rather than ignoring or accommodating for how they touch every single aspect of my life. There is nothing that was allowed to be “good”- not even something relatively meaningless like my IQ, which the lawyer was displeased with.

My lawyer was very thorough with his prep. Really, that is part of why he’s a great lawyer for this sort of law. He knows what they are looking for, and he is forthright. It’s a difficult process, even with the assistance in figuring out the paperwork and who to talk to to get the evidence that is asked for and so on. It is hard work, draining and demoralizing, even with the support I had.

Part of the prep work involves the lawyer working with you to help you communicate how thoroughly your disability impacts your life. I had been brought up by a mother who tried to emphasize strengths based approaches, ones that could limit some of the trauma that society can cause when your brain or body doesn’t work within the range that the average person does. This process was the opposite. My strengths were to be minimized, the limits that my disabilities put on them emphasized. Uplifting language was considered not appropriate, as it was said to disguise the impact that my struggles have.

That I believe in and on my good days fight for disability rights was even considered a hindrance  My lawyer told me he hates activist/advocate clients, and only because we have harder cases to make. The language and work that keeps us from despair, that gives us some hope that some day life will not be as much of an up hill battle, that says that we should and someday will be seen as equal- all of this was something that is looked down on and despised. The fact that we want to and can envision the sort of world where the supports and environments we need to not have to go through the SSI/SSDI process in order to survive is too uplifting, too insightful for us to need and “deserve” anything in the right now. The fact that it is just a hope that is still being worked toward, that that world where those supports exist isn’t here fully yet, is irrelevant when it is something we believe in.

The preparation process also involved undermining a lot of the work I had done to allow myself to get by in my day to day life with a limited number of meltdowns and panic attacks. I still deal daily with memories of the things that were said to me by my step father and some of the providers when I was young. I have many little things that will trigger the memories, that will make me slip into the words that were said. Before going through this process, I had a few things that I would repeat to myself to counter them- it didn’t make them go away, but it made it so that I was left with shorter periods of distress, or delayed reactions. But part of the process was to emphasize the counter arguments- that is, to repeat in a not as cruel way the things that caused me trauma in the first place about myself. To emphasize incompetence  the futility of the things I have achieved and the impossibility of success at the things that I wanted. To demonstrate less than.

I find myself, now, more incapacitated by these things than I have in years.

Throughout, I’ve clung to my advocacy and activism around disability. I’ve felt like a hypocrite, or like I was-had to be- doing it for someone else, because what was being re-taught to me was so against it all. But I’ve also felt like I was surviving, that this work was like some sort of safety line. I don’t know how well or if I would have survived it without.

Perhaps the level of struggle I’m having has to do with the nature of some of my disabilities. That perhaps the anxiety disorder processes and the tendency toward fixation from being autistic are what they call a perfect storm, moving towards a cataclysmic failure when they interact with a system that encourages devaluing. The part of me that thinks this reflects about the way that some of my friends don’t seem as traumatized as I feel from their time going through this. I know that in some cases this isn’t true- it’s just not something they want to or can discuss. I know trauma is like that, from both personal experience and from the writings of others. And yes, perhaps some really weren’t traumatized by the process, left struggling inside more while their supports and safety outside are stronger.

But as much as the part of my brain where the fear lives fixates on that, the part where logic lives knows that it’s irrelevant. No one should be coming out of this process struggling emotionally more than when they entered it. They should be in a position where the security and services that become available allow them to gain skills, either to better their quality of life or to eventually not need financial support, even if they do need the medical. None of us should be having to scrape back old skills because we lost the connections that allowed for them.

I’m terrified to post this. But perhaps that is because of what I’ve written- and maybe that fear is what has kept someone else isolated too.