UN-Healthy PA: Comments on the Current Proposed Medicaid Plan in PA

I’m terrified, and I’m angry. I normally don’t much like to do too much state-specific stuff on this blog, but I’m having a terrible time processing this out and it feels like writing a post here is my only solution. I can’t understand what sort of person would think that the proposed Medicaid expansion plan for PA is a good idea.

It’s not that I’m against expanding Medicaid- I’m a full supporter of allowing access to Medical Assistance (MA) to anyone who needs it. Indeed, I’d be on board with universal access to public healthcare. But that’s not the problem with this. Instead the current proposals undermines rather than enhances the existing system, punishes the unemployed, and threatens the health and well being of vulnerable Pennsylvanians. Vulnerable Pennsylvanians including myself.

Disability Rights Network of Pennsylvania, along with some other organizations, have released calls to action encouraging Pennsylvanians of all sorts to comment on how destructive the current proposal is. (I have posted the text of both of the emails I received from DRNPA on tumblr.) My mother posted about it on facebook with the following comment:

Pennsylvanians! If you receive Disability and are over 21, benefits are going to be cut, mental health is being slashed and there will be caps on services . I do not understand how Governor Corbett can call this “Healthy PA” when our most vulnerable populations are being underserved. If you live in PA, you probably know someone who will be affected. This was slid in around the holidays, so most folks do not know about this. Comment period ends soon, January 13. Speak up before it is too late! And share.

And I? I am terrified. Not immediately, but in that poisonous way that leaves you hyper vigilant, exhausted, and unable to do anything about it for ages. It’s not an unfamiliar sensation to me. I’ve dealt with extended homelessness, abuse, lack of access to health care, and so on in the past. I’ve been in poverty for a large part of my memory. This type of terror is a constant throb in the background that says you can’t afford to be sickyou can’t afford those “necessities,” and don’t speak, if you speak up you’ll lose what you have left. It’s a horrible way to live even if you don’t already have an anxiety disorder; when you do, it makes thinking about the next step nearly impossible.

A lot of people were under the impression, either because our governor lied to us or because they can’t imagine it otherwise, that it wouldn’t impact people either already on Medicaid or on SSI. Yet it does. Coverage  limits will be imposed, “non-emergency” emergency room visits will now have a co-pay, and MAWD will no longer be a thing.

These coverage limits will limit the number of MH related visits you are allowed a year. As someone over 21 on SSI, I would be put on the High-Risk plan. Right now, I don’t quite go over the allowed 40 visits a year because I’m not in mental health crisis, and I’m not at a point where intensive work is being done. But if I were to be in crisis and need to switch over to even one more therapy appointment a month (let alone extra MH med checks that happen in times of crisis) I’d be over the limit. And this is in the more permissive plan. Now, I have decent MH care, but a lot of people don’t. A lot of people are stuck with doctors who are demeaning and dehumanizing, and more than willing to write you up for small things. While this state of things has gotten a little better over time, it’s still an issue- and with a financial reason not to comply, those people who do have bad doctors would have one more reason to just not go.

For me this is more complicated- if I were having to discontinue my MH treatments, I could lose my housing without a ton of work on the part of both my health proxy and my case manager. I currently have a special housing voucher for people with MH needs who have experienced a certain threshold of homelessness. In order to keep it there’s a number of stipulations, one of which is that I must continue MH treatment and comply to it. (Which is a reason to be especially picky about who those providers are, as reports that I’m non-compliant can get me in trouble.) Not coming to the number of appointments that are deemed needed by the professional can be seen as non-compliance. If I had a different psychiatrist, refusing to take a medication because I want to try a different one or categorically disagree with the type of medication could be written up as in violation.

Heaven forbid under this proposed plan my mobility issues get to the point where I need to deal with the paperwork to get a proper wheelchair. (Right now I use one only in settings where I’d otherwise need to stand for extended periods of time, and I use an inherited hospital style chair that isn’t really designed for you to wheel yourself around safely.) The combined annual limit on my “high risk” plan for medical supplies and durable medical equipment is only $2500 under the new law. If I were a full time AAC user in addition to the current restrictions and complications to get a decent replacement device, I or my health proxy would have to try and predict if any of my other equipment would need replaced. If I required, as some of the people I’ve met in my peer education and advocacy work do, a more complex system that also needed accessories like those for mounting to a wheelchair, I could be in trouble- some of the more complex devices might even exceed that yearly cap.

Currently, I have to get fairly regular lab work to maintain my health, find appropriate treatments, and monitor those treatments I’ve already settled into. But the new system would limit the amount of lab work I’d be allowed each year- and my health conditions aren’t even on the highly complex end of lab work requirements. Additionally if I had to get more than 4 out patient “surgeries” a year- which include things you might not always think of as such like the colonoscopy and endoscopy I had to have this fall- I’d be in a lot of trouble.

What truly counts as emergency visits to the emergency room? Would my severely dehydrated and unable to call anyone but 911 for help  because I was on a tract phone visit a few years ago count? I probably would have lived a few more days. What about being in so much pain I was delirious but was sent away with antibiotics and an inaccurate diagnosis? Or when I had an abscess that my dentist later said was severe but the ER said was only a cavity, even though I came in screaming and couldn’t wait any longer? And I’m someone who has access to both a primary care provider I trust and can usually get in to in a reasonable amount of time, as well as access to specialists. What if I lived somewhere where my doctor was over booked and couldn’t take short term appointments? What if I didn’t have any place that urgent but non-emergency care could be provided that I could get to? What if I couldn’t get anyplace further than the hospital? If I lived in a county where there was no one to visit but the hospital for certain things? PA, for all that we show off our beautiful capitol, the bridges of Pittsburgh, or the sprawl of Philly, is mostly a rural state. Pennsylvania has more individuals living in rural areas than any other state in the US. From where I live I regularly have a 5+ hour drive to visit Harrisburg, and to see my psychiatrist (who is a specialist in my diagnostic combination) it is about 2 hours. It isn’t always as easy as identifying the right doctor on your own, if you can even do that. Transportation in our state is kind of appalling.

And that doesn’t even factor in the fact that we’ve lived in a culture where the poor are taught that anything BUT going to the ER is a luxury, and in some cases even that is out of reach. Many hospitals will still treat you so that you are “stabilized” even if you can’t afford treatment, either billing you later or making you apply for grants to cover your treatment. (And some of those can remove your treatment options- read your paperwork.) For a while now, the ER has been a treatment hub for the poor, and that doesn’t change by punishing the poor. I can kind of understand limiting ER visits in the long run, but before that we need to enact cultural changes that won’t happen until the poor have an alternative.

MAWD is Medical Assistance for Workers with Disabilities. MAWD lets people with disabilities earn enough money to support themselves, or at least work towards that point, without losing your medical benefits. This is a big deal- if you are on SSI or SSDI there’s a cap on how much money you can earn without losing everything. For some people the only reason they can work is because of the level of medical care and supports that come with being an SSI Medicaid recipient. Trust me, the image of an SSI recipient being lazy is usually a myth. Most of us want to work as we can, even if it’s only a few hours a week and can’t support ourselves with it or in an extremely customized setting, but are terrified that if we work too much we will lose access to supports that we need. And what if we do leave the program and crash, becoming unable to work again? MAWD helps make a return to work possible, and the idea less of a threat. Right now it works as a buy in program- if you are making too much to keep getting SSI/SSDI, you pay 5% of your monthly income and are covered. The new plan, however, removes MAWD and the specialized support in navigation that MAWD has for people with disabilities and lumps you in with others. Additionally, the proposed plan has an income limit of 133% of the poverty level compared to MAWD’s 250%.

All of this is just specific to people like me. If you aren’t in an exempt group, there are premiums, additional income limits, hour/week work requirements (you have to work more than 20 hours a week or else you have to be actively searching for a job), and you can be barred from Medicaid for as much as 9 months at a time for missing a premium payment. As someone who believes that access to medical care is a human right REGARDLESS of if you have a job, do the “right” things, or lose track of your bills, I find it morally reprehensible. But even without those beliefs, even just sticking to the changes for those who are already medicaid eligible, it’s clear that this new plan would devastate the poor in our beautiful state.

So much for “Healthy PA.”

The deadline to submit comments is MONDAY, JANUARY 13th, 2014 (Edit: Has Closed.).

You can submit your comments according to this info from DRNPA:

It is important for the disability community to submit comments on the Draft 1115 Waiver application.  Written comments must be submitted to the Department by January 13, 2014.  Written comments may be emailed to ra-PWHealthyPA1115@pa.gov or mailed to: Department of Public Welfare, Attention: Healthy Pennsylvania Waiver, P.O. Box 2675, Harrisburg, PA 17105-2675.  Persons with a disability who require an auxiliary aid or service may submit comments using the Pennsylvania AT&T Relay Service at 800-654-5984 (TDD users) or 800-654-5988 (voice users).

For further information, please check out DRNPA’s Overview. Bullet points are really effective when sending in your comments, so keep that in mind if you send a comment in.

You might not live in PA, but I encourage you to look at your state’s plan- some of the other plans out there are also questionable, but you might not have heard about them.

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One thought on “UN-Healthy PA: Comments on the Current Proposed Medicaid Plan in PA

  1. Pingback: Initial Thoughts on John Scalzi’s “Lock In” (Spoilers) | Cracked Mirror in Shalott

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